UNM Meteorite Museum

On a trip to Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2002, I visited the meteorite museum at the University of New Mexico and photographed a few of these rocks that have fallen from space. The museum is organized by the three main types of meteorite: Stony, Iron, and Stony-Iron. In the caption for each photo, I give the name of the meteorite, the location where it was found, and some information copied from the display card.


[021018_14.jpg]
The museum is located in Northrop Hall on the UNM campus.


[021018_36.jpg]
This "Meteorites of New Mexico" display shows where different specimens have been recovered within the state.


Stony Meteorites

[021018_35.jpg]
Norton County (Kansas) (right foreground) - Achondrite (a type of stony meteorite with no chondrules, or spherical inclusions). This is the 2nd largest stone meteorite ever found on earth.


[021018_01.jpg]
Pasamonte (New Mexico) - An achondrite with a fusion crust (glassy surface material that was melted during atmospheric entry).


[021018_08.jpg]
Dar Al Gani (Libyan Desert) - This meteorite originally came from the planet Mars.


Iron Meteorites

[021018_09.jpg]
Sikhoth Alin (USSR) - Hexahedrite (type of iron meteorite with low nickel content, apparently structureless).


[021018_10.jpg]
Navaho (Apache City, Arizona) - Octahedrite (type of iron meteorite with medium nickel content). This is 1/2 of the original meteorite, which weighed 1600 lbs.


[021018_06.jpg]
Tres Casillos (Mexico) - Octahedrite (note the Widmanstatten pattern of the iron-nickel crystals due to slow cooling in space).


[021018_04.jpg]
Wolf Creek (Australia) - Shale ball (completely oxidized iron fragment).


Stony-Iron Meteorites

[021018_02.jpg]
Marjalaht (USSR) - Pallasite (type of stony-iron meteorite having a mixture of iron-nickel metal and the stony mineral olivine).


[021018_11.jpg]
Brenham (Kansas) - Pallasite (note olivine crystal in metal matrix).


All photos taken using Kodak Ektachrome E200 professional slide film with Olympus OM-1 35mm camera on fixed tripod, scanned with Nikon Coolscan LS-10E.

The meteorite museum is run by the Institute of Meteoritics in UNM's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. Admission is currently by advance arrangement only; call (505) 277-1644 to make an appointment. More information may be found at the museum web page.


Revised: April 24, 2006
Copyright © 2003 Joe Orman
Back to Meteors and Satellites Gallery
Back to Joe Orman's Photo Pages
Back to Joe Orman's Home Page